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Purpose/Impact

Lee’s project submission, INTARSIA, was an effort to learn the Renaissance technique of stone inlay intarsia and to create a work of art in her own aesthetic voice. By the use of 3D Rhino model making, the student 3D-printed the inlay in the trinket box to achieve precise measurement and layout for stone cutting. 

Conrad approached her research in two phases: first, she reverse-engineered traditional Japanese alloys — shibuichi and shakudo — recreating them in a modern studio lab setting. Second, she attempted to “honor the past and grow the future” by creating contemporary artistic contexts for these ancient alloys. The research combined metallurgy, chemistry, and a bit of botany, as Conrad applied the acid from daikon radishes to prepare the surfaces of the alloys to accept patina color at the molecular level. 

Outcomes/Accomplishments

Because most research is typically conducted by graduate students, the SUNY Undergraduate Research Conference is a means to highlight the innovative research that SUNY students at the undergraduate level are completing. Additionally, these students each used their artistic abilities to visually reinterpret traditional works. 

Status Update

Through the work of faculty mentors such as Wendy Yothers and Tomoyuki Chie Teratani, FIT expects to continue to be honored presenters at the SUNY Undergraduate Research Conference.

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